Tales of Nursing Student..

LWC Nursing student. Junior. 20 years old. studying my life away. #nursingproblems
dogshaming:

 Partners in crime: Watson (left) has a taste for socks, so we don’t leave them out where he can get them. Mesa (right) fishes them out of the laundry and smuggles them to the puppy. Sneaky kitty.

dogshaming:

Partners in crime: Watson (left) has a taste for socks, so we don’t leave them out where he can get them. Mesa (right) fishes them out of the laundry and smuggles them to the puppy. Sneaky kitty.

(Source: dogshaming)

thenursingblog:

General Adaptation Syndrome
Alarm reaction stage, stress stimulates the body to send messages from the hypothal- amus to the glands (such as the adrenal gland to send out adrenalin and norepinephrine for fuel) and organs (such as the liver to reconvert glycogen stores to glucose for food) to pre- pare for potential defense needs
Resistance stage, the digestive system reduces function to shunt blood to areas needed for defense. The lungs take in more air, and the heart beats faster and harder so it can circulate this highly oxygenated and highly nourished blood to the muscles to defend the body by fight, flight, or freeze behaviors. If the person adapts to the stress, the body responses relax, and the gland, organ, and systemic responses abate.
Exhaustion stage occurs when the person has responded negatively to anxiety and stress: body stores are depleted or the emotional components are not resolved, resulting in continual arousal of the physio- logic responses and little reserve capacity.

thenursingblog:

General Adaptation Syndrome

  • Alarm reaction stage, stress stimulates the body to send messages from the hypothal- amus to the glands (such as the adrenal gland to send out adrenalin and norepinephrine for fuel) and organs (such as the liver to reconvert glycogen stores to glucose for food) to pre- pare for potential defense needs
  • Resistance stage, the digestive system reduces function to shunt blood to areas needed for defense. The lungs take in more air, and the heart beats faster and harder so it can circulate this highly oxygenated and highly nourished blood to the muscles to defend the body by fight, flight, or freeze behaviors. If the person adapts to the stress, the body responses relax, and the gland, organ, and systemic responses abate.
  • Exhaustion stage occurs when the person has responded negatively to anxiety and stress: body stores are depleted or the emotional components are not resolved, resulting in continual arousal of the physio- logic responses and little reserve capacity.

(Source: )